Block.One Is Taking a Bigger Role With EOS (And That’s a Big Deal)

Block.One has decided to start voting with its hoard of EOS tokens.

Announced last week, the decision finds the startup that created the EOS software, now powered by the fifth most valuable cryptocurrency, breaking with precedent in a move that may have come as a surprise to those following the project’s decentralized launch.



That’s because since going live on June 14, the company has largely declined to exercise its influence over the code, preferring to encourage its users to unite, even in sometimes messy decision-making.

And there’s a good reason for that. For one, Block.One controls 10 percent of the 1 billion tokens set aside for developers prior to the network’s launch. Further, since decision-making on the platform corresponds to token holdings, the change could put the company in an extraordinarily powerful position, enabling them to decide who can determine truth on the ledger.

As of now, each wallet can vote to up to 30 candidates to serve as block producers, however, it’s worth noting that block producers with the most support on the network have less than 3 percent of the current token supply backing them.

This means that Block.One controls so many tokens, that the field of potential block producers could effectively narrow to the 30 it picked, if and when it decides to finally enter a vote.

It’s no surprise then, that the move has left some alarmed.

“I find it problematic that Block.one is now involved in selecting block producers, as it undermines their role as a neutral third party, and affords them a significant amount of influence over the network,” Arianna Simpson of Autonomous Partners told CoinDesk via email. (Simpson is not an investor in EOS.)

But others believe the decision is in line with necessity of innovation.

Christian Catalini of MIT’s Cryptoeconomics Lab argued that each new approach to crypto governance deserves a chance to be tested so the wider crypto world can benefit from its lessons, saying, “In general when you experiment you may land on solutions that may look appealing but don’t stand the test of time.”

That said, the EOS community has largely expressed excitement about the company taking an active role in governance.

On a Reddit thread about the news, this reaction was fairly representative:

“I have been waiting for this. I think this is a good thing, and will continue to align interests … If Block.One makes money, I will make money as well most likely.”

But intermixed with the positive reactions, there were also observations like this one:

“I think EOS will do great things, but this makes it Ripple 2.0. It’s essentially a blockchain that is owned and run by Block.One. I’m not even saying that’s a bad thing, but let’s not kid ourselves either.”

How voting works

By design, EOS only has 21 block producers. The small size allows them to come to consensus very quickly, which is why EOS supporters believe it can surpass the leading blockchains by overtaking it in transactions per second.

The EOS community elects these 21 block producers in a continuous election, which allows bad actors to be removed at any time. Each wallet can vote its tokens for up to 30 block producer candidates. The 21 organizations with the most votes get to do that work, for which they are rewarded with some of tokens emitted through inflation by the protocol.

One of the reasons it took EOS so long to finally activate was because the software wouldn’t go live until 15 percent of the total token supply had been staked for votes, but, as of this writing, roughly 30 percent of the tokens are staked for voting.

Block.One’s founder tokens gradually release over a 10-year period. Until then, all they can do is stake them for use of the network, including voting. They can only cast one ballot and since all their tokens are staked until they unlock, they have to vote all of them or none.

As one redditor who looked at the wallet balances in the genesis block reported, 99 percent of EOS token holders control less than 14 percent of the token supply. The top 1,000 wallets control 85 percent of the supply. So, it remains very much a network controlled by its richest users.

Block.One is the largest single holder. Joshua Kauffman, who leads governance and community efforts for one of the top block producers, EOS Canada, told CoinDesk that he believes Block.One, ironically, wants to exercise its vote to undermine other whales.

There’s a few block producers with very little support from small holders, he said, suggesting they are propped up by whale votes. Kauffman believes Block.One wants a chance to vote for the technically strongest candidates with the most community support in order to support the consensus of the most users.

“It’s in their best interest and the community’s best interest to insure the best possible producers are the ones running the network,” Kauffman said.

When it announced its intention to vote, Block.One also expressed support for a code change so that it can support 50 or more block producer candidates. That way, it’s more widely spreading around its big votes, allowing the community to make the final decision about who gets into the top 21.

It would take a minimum of two months for such a code change to go live, according to Kauffman, so if Block.One waits for that change to vote, it could still be a while

Big decisions ahead

Besides changing out block producers, EOS faces other big decisions going forward, and by taking part in block producer elections, Block.One could make its say over those decisions even more decisive.

First, EOS hasn’t yet passed a constitution to govern the protocol, so it doesn’t have official rules for how block producers should resolve conflicts, as we have previously reported.

To fix it, Block.One has proposed a completely new constitution. The new constitution is much more narrow in scope than the one developed by the community. The company is asking longtime supports to jettison all that work in favor of a narrow proposal.

Block.One cofounder and EOS creator Dan Larimer wrote in a Medium post:

“”I have seen that if you give people arbitrary power to resolve arbitrary disputes then everything becomes a dispute and the decisions made are arbitrary.”

Second, the worker proposal system is coming closer to fruition. That system will allow the community to vote on paying tokens generated by inflation to teams that want to build new products to make the whole protocol serve users better.

With time, decisions about these proposals could also be important in determining the direction the network takes.

Even if Block.One abstains from votes in both of these cases, block producers with its support are likely to follow its lead, and the supporters of those block producers are likely to follow them.

By expanding the number of block producer candidates it can vote for, it might also expand the number that feel inclined to follow the company’s lead.

“I agree that Block.One has an oversized voice,” Kauffman granted, but he also pointed out that the best way for Block.One to grow its wealth is by increasing token value. Disenfranchising rank-and-file users by controlling the process won’t achieve that, he argued.

“They want this to be the community chain,” he said.

EOS is experimenting in a space that blockchains haven’t adequately grappled with, Catalini said.

He and his collaborator Joshua Gans explained in a 2016 paper, this means that EOS has dramatically lowered the cost of verification, but it’s now facing another cost also described in that work, the cost of networking.

Blockchains don’t only need to come to consensus around the truth, they also need to find a way to coordinate economic activity around the world. That’s their networking cost, and “that’s the one that really changes market power and market structure,” Catalini said.

He added:

“That’s the one we don’t really have a governance structure for; that’s why you’re seeing so many false starts.”


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Here Is How Tron’s (TRX) MainNet Launch Outgunned That of EOS

The word ‘outgunned’ is defined as outdoing or overwhelming your opponent by superior forces. Once you read the word, you think about the numerous Hollywood movies where the action hero with the most guns wins the final battle. But this is no war-zone; neither is it a movie. It is the world we love of crypto and blockchain. In this world, we have witnessed the launch of two magnificent Mainnets in the last one month. That of Tron (TRX) and that of EOS (EOS).



Both were equally exciting for the buzz around the crypto-verse was that these two projects were plausible Ethereum killers. But that is where the similarities end. The launches of both MainNets were totally opposite as shall be elaborated.

Constant communication by both projects

Justin Sun has overcome FUD to become one of the most trusted faces in the crypto-verse. His constant communication to TRON believers is second to none with clear milestones and roadmaps of when the MainNet was to be launched as well as what would happen after. We knew the dates and exact time with timezone references, as to when the MainNet would be launched as well as the Genesis block. There is also constant communication on the status of the ERC20 token migration as well as coin burns and token lockups.

EOS, on the other hand, has no such public figure to reassure the project believers about what was happening during the Mainnet launch. As a matter of fact, no one knew for sure if the MainNet was to be launched on the 2nd of June or the 3rd of June. Also, there is no one figure to elaborate the on-goings in the current constitutional crisis.

Bugs and Bug bounty programs

With the respect to bugs, the EOS MainNet was found to have a severe bug only days before the launch of the MainNet. This bug could allow a rogue miner to hijack the entire network using a smart contract and start wrecking havoc in the form of mining other blockchain networks. The bug was patched and a bug bounty program was soon initiated with a reward cap of $10,000.

Tron then took it upon itself, through Justin and the Tron Foundation, to make sure they had a lucrative bug bountyprogram when the MainNet was launched on the 31st of May. The upper cap of the reward was set at $10 Million meaning the best of the best of security experts and teams probably went knocking at the door of the Tron Foundation seeking to test the MainNet. As a result, the Mainnet has not experienced any known bug since the genesis block went live.

However, EOS has experienced another glitch that has resulted in several accounts being frozen as well as a constitutional crisis.

Constitutional crisis

Block.one, the creator of EOS, is proposing the abolishing of the current constitution less than a month since the MainNet released the Genesis block after a voting stalemate. On the other hand, the Tron project currently has Super Representative elections ongoing with plans of a constitution in the works.

The difference is clear

One can argue that Tron managed to learn from the immediate mistakes of EOS. This is a very valid way of viewing things. Then again, TRON has for the longest of times being the underdog in this crypto-verse with EOS enjoying parade-like praise since the inception of the project. This means that the team at Tron had to put in double the effort to prove their mettle. The planning and execution witnessed through the Tron Foundation can only be described as being meticulous. Perhaps it is this attention to detail by the team that will eventually make Tron end up outshining Ethereum.


Here at Dollar Destruction, we endeavour to bring to you the latest, most important news from around the globe. We scan the web looking for the most valuable content and dish it right up for you! The content of this article was provided by the source referenced. Dollar Destruction does not endorse and is not responsible for or liable for any content, accuracy, quality, advertising, products or other materials on this page. As always, we encourage you to perform your own research!

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Author: DAVID GEKKO
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