Blockchain Browser Brave to Offer Free Access to Premium Cheddar Content

Blockchain-based internet browser Brave has partnered with news website Cheddar to offer free access to its premium content for a limited period.

The firms jointly announced Tuesday that Brave browser users will be able to automatically unlock premium content on Cheddar website for the next three months starting today.

“Cheddar viewers are obsessed with crypto; we even have a show dedicated to it – The Crypto Craze. The idea of unlocking our premium feeds for Brave users via crypto funding, with no sign-up, seemed like a natural way to engage a passionate community,” said Jon Steinberg, Cheddar’s founder and CEO.

Brave, founded in 2015 by Mozilla co-founder Brendan Eich, raised about $35 million under 30 seconds through a sale of its ethereum-based basic attention token (BAT) back in May 2017.

Since then, the privacy-focused browser, which claims to have 5.5 million monthly active users currently, has been looking to offer new services. Last April, it partnered with Dow Jones Media Group to experiment with a blockchain content delivery system.

Most recently, Brave said that it will begin using blockchain identity startup Civic’s verification services to ensure publishers are paid for their content with its token.

BAT was also recently added by crypto exchange Coinbase to its retail and professional trading platforms.


Source
Author: Yogita Khatri
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There’s more: Google is also said to be developing a censored news app for China

Can Google’s week get any worse? Less than a day after the revelation that it is planning a censored search engine for China, so comes another: the U.S. firm is said to be developing a government-friendly news app for the country, where its search engine and other services remain blocked.

LIONBIT

That’s according to The Information which reports that Google is essentially cloning Toutiao, the hugely popular app from new media startup ByteDance, in a bid to get back into the country and the minds of its 700 million mobile internet users. Like Toutiao, the app would apparently use AI and algorithms to serve stories to readers — as opposed to real-life human editors — while it too would be designed to work within the bounds of Chinese internet censorship.

That last part is interesting because ByteDance and other news apps have gotten into trouble from the government for failing to adequately police the content shared on their platforms. That’s resulted in some app store suspensions, but the saga itself is a rite of passage for any internet service that has gained mainstream option, so there’s a silver lining in there. But the point for Google is that policing this content is not as easy as it may seem.

AVINOC

The Information said the news app is slated for release before the search app, the existence of which was revealed yesterday, but sources told the publication that the ongoing U.S.-China trade war has made things complicated. Specifically, Google executives have “struggled to further engage” China’s internet censor, a key component for the release of an app in China from an overseas company.

There’s plenty of context to this, as I wrote yesterday:

The Intercept’s report comes less than a week after Facebook briefly received approval to operate a subsidiary on Chinese soil. Its license was, however, revoked as news of the approval broke. The company said it had planned to open an innovation center, but it isn’t clear whether that will be possible now.

Facebook previously built a censorship-friendly tool that could be deployed in China.

While its U.S. peer has struggled to get a read on China, Google has been noticeably increasing its presence in the country over the past year or so.

The company has opened an AI lab in Beijing, been part of investment rounds for Chinese companies, including a $550 million deal with JD.com, and inked a partnership with Tencent. It has also launched products, with a file management service for Android distributed via third-party app stores and, most recently, its first mini program for Tencent’s popular WeChat messaging app.
As for Google, the company pointed us to the same statement it issued yesterday:

We provide a number of mobile apps in China, such as Google Translate and Files Go, help Chinese developers, and have made significant investments in Chinese companies like JD.com. But we don’t comment on speculation about future plans.
Despite two-for-one value on that PR message, this is a disaster. Plotting to collude with governments to censor the internet never goes down well, especially in double helpings.

Despite two-for-one value on that PR message, this is a disaster. Plotting to collude with governments to censor the internet never goes down well, especially in double helpings.


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Source
Author: Jon Russell
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