IOTA [MIOTA] emerges as the winner in the vehicular applications feasibility test

IOTA [MIOTA] released a research paper titled ”IOTA Feasibility and Perspectives for Enabling Vehicular Applications” on 29th August, which discusses the possibilities of using IOTA Tangle as an underlying feature to enhance privacy in vehicular applications.

The paper authored by Paulo C. Bartolomeu [DETI, IT], Emanuel Vieira [DETI], and Joaquim Ferreira [ESTGA, IT] speaks about the very interesting Automobile Industry. Over the recent years, the automotive industry has undergone a huge shapeshift from what it originally was. Lately, industries and businesses have started migrating to the ‘much-talked-about concept’, the “Internet of Things” [IoT] where all small and big things referred to as ‘smart things’ are connected through the Internet.

The concept of IoT has been significantly adopted by the automobile industry in the recent past. The adoption brought forward the idea of ‘Autonomous Vehicles’ [driverless/self-driving vehicles]. The transition has been very notable. The paper stated:

“Vehicles became autonomous and (wireless) communications have evolved to provide connectivity with quality of service and flexibility tailored to enable such applications.”

It further explained:

“The future of transport and mobility will surely be enabled by autonomous vehicles encompassing sensing capabilities that can cooperate with each other and share their sensing resources and perspective with the nearby infrastructures and neighboring vehicles.”

In the authors’ opinion, many challenges remain ahead in terms of key aspects like privacy, security, and anonymity. The authors briefly attempt to explain hackings of vehicular systems that have happened in the past. Citing an example from 2015, the authors stated:

“In 2015, Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek have demonstrated that they could take control over the Internet of a Jeep Cherokee’s entertainment system by meddling with the dashboard functions, steering, brakes, and transmission, all from a laptop that could be anywhere in the world.”

Furthermore, the emerging blockchain technology can propose as a new security solution that complements the existing ones. The authors stated:

“Over the last few years the blockchain technology has managed to attract immense attention due to its intrinsic properties such as trustless operation, immutability, transparency, easy verification, cryptographic security, auditability and independence of third parties.”

According to the research, an increasing number of applications are adopting blockchain technology. However, an increase in the use of blockchain technology has brought many concerns like the reliance on the private key, high computing power, latency, bias towards nodes. Here, the authors bring in IOTA’s Tangle as a solution.

The authors attempted to analyze IOTA’s feasibility through a globally set up analysis and then observe the result of the experiment.

The experiment used a basic test setup using two nodes [NodeA], hosted in Norway, and a private node [node B] hosted in a Virtual Private Server [VPS] in Germany. The latter was connected to the Tangle network using the CarrIOTA Nelson project. The authors aimed to identify key operational performance parameters. Parameters like latency and privacy were put to test.

The paper concluded that the IOTA Tangle exhibits smaller transaction delays than the existing public blockchain, making it an ideal candidate for vehicular applications. The authors also came to a second conclusion stating that it also supports enabling of privacy in vehicular communications with no or negligible latency overhead.

The use cases of the IoT based blockchain has spread its wings in the recent weeks. Earlier this month, the Japanese tech giant Fujitsu announced that they will be rolling out IOTA as their new protocol standard.


Source
Author: Anvita M V
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Fujitsu Promises to Deliver Viable Blockchain Project Within 5 days

IT giant Fujitsu is launching a new consultancy service that will double as a blockchain product package, delivering a viable blockchain project to customers within five days. Prices for the service start at EUR 9,900, and include everything from blockchain lessons to building a prototype within the time frame, according to The Register.



When they receive their prototype, clients can decide whether they want to pay more Fujitsu to develop the service further, or if they want to keep it as is. Chris Pilling, lead architect at Fujitsu’s Blockchain Innovation Centre, says, “It would be great to say, yes, we’ve met the proof of business and they want to get the global blockchain team involved… [but] we allow the customer to go away and play with the prototype.”

“Proof of business” is set to be almost the opposite of proof of concept. Clients can run through a business process that focuses on creating business value and avoids common problems with blockchain projects, according to Frederik de Breuck, head of the Blockchain Innovation Centre. Customers will, however, be asked to sign up to a license that dictates what they can and can’t do with the prototype, which means it will likely be kept in the house.

According to Banking Tech, the company already holds close to 50 different patents on blockchain technology. Fujitsu is also currently helping to commercialize the Hyperledger’s (an umbrella project of open source blockchains and related tools) Fabric product, the development of which should be completed later this year. This means that Fujitsu’s influence on the blockchain space should not be underestimated. Who knows, you may be able to buy your blockchain prototype like you’d buy a fridge or hairdryer. Almost.


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Author: Sead Fadilpasic
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Fujitsu and Japanese Police Team up for Crypto and Blockchain Training

Japanese tech giant Fujitsu has been helping train regional police forces in the Chiba Prefecture in blockchain and cryptocurrency-related matters.

Per Nikkei, Fujitsu held a series of joint, “knowledge-sharing” workshops, co-hosted with cyber police officials, briefing some 50 police officers and Fujitsu employees about the latest developments in cryptocurrency-related crime, blockchain security measures and means of investigating potential fraud cases related to cryptocurrencies.

Nikkei quotes a Chiba-based Fujitsu spokesperson as saying, “We want to lead crime deterrence and blockchain technology development.”

The same media outlet also quotes a senior police officer in Chiba’s cybercrime division as saying, “We must develop a robust system that can help us cope with cryptocurrency-related crime. We will continue to deepen our collaboration with companies like Fujitsu to prevent the abuse of cryptocurrencies.”

Fujitsu signed a “cybersecurity partnership” agreement with the Chiba police in July last year, and the company is actively pursuing a range of blockchain-related developments both in Japan and abroad.

Chiba police, meanwhile, have been cracking down on web developers running cryptocurrency mining apps – such as Coinhive software – on their websites. Local Japanese police forces have termed extensions of this sort “viruses,” and have hit developers with hundreds of dollars’ worth of fines.



Here at Dollar Destruction, we endeavour to bring to you the latest, most important news from around the globe. We scan the web looking for the most valuable content and dish it right up for you! The content of this article was provided by the source referenced. Dollar Destruction does not endorse and is not responsible for or liable for any content, accuracy, quality, advertising, products or other materials on this page. As always, we encourage you to perform your own research!

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Author: Tim Alper
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