Facebook to work on high-speed wireless internet!

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Facebook has now enlisted Qualcomm to provide the tech for its gigabit Wi-Fi project that is meant to make sending data through routers more efficient and increase internet speeds. It’s called the Terragraph Project and it’s been in the works since Facebook first announced it at the company’s 2016 annual developer conference, describing the project as a “multi-node wireless system focused on bringing high-speed internet connectivity to dense urban areas.”New Qualcomm chipsets will be integrated with the Terragraph technology so manufacturers can hopefully upgrade routers to be able to send data at the 60GHz frequency, which will increase broadband connections to higher speeds.

A Qualcomm spokesperson described it as a solution for both rural areas and urban areas that simply have spotty Wi-Fi in certain regions. Field tests are set to begin in the middle of next year, but there’s no word on when the Terragraph Project will actually go live. We’ve reached out to Facebook for more information.

Qualcomm is also making a 5G small cell chipset for phone manufacturers and carriers, which the company announced today as well. Qualcomm is already working with “early access” partners. There’s no word on exactly who those carriers will be, but given previous partnerships, it’s likely Nokia and Samsung could be among them. Samples of chipsets will become available next year, meaning that the product release will be further down the line than that.


Here at Dollar Destruction, we endeavour to bring to you the latest, most important news from around the globe. We scan the web looking for the most valuable content and dish it right up for you! The content of this article was provided by the source referenced. Dollar Destruction does not endorse and is not responsible for or liable for any content, accuracy, quality, advertising, products or other materials on this page. As always, we encourage you to perform your own research!

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Author: Shannon Liao
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Zuckerberg Owns or Clones Most of the “8 Social Apps” He Cites as Competition

Mark Zuckerberg’s flimsy defense when congress asked about a lack of competition to Facebook has been to cite that the average American uses eight social apps. But that conveniently glosses over the fact that Facebook owns three of the top 10 U.S. iOS apps: #4 Instagram, #6 Messenger, and #8 Facebook according to App Annie. The top 3 apps are games. Facebook is building its Watch video hub to challenge #5 YouTube, and has relentlessly cloned Stories to beat #7 Snapchat. And Facebook also owns #19 WhatsApp. Zoom in to just “social networking apps”, and Facebook owns the entire top 3.

“The average American I think uses eight different communication and social apps. So there’s a lot of different choice and a lot of innovation and activity going on in this space” Zuckerberg said when asked about whether Facebook is a monopoly by Senator Graham during yesterday’s Senate hearing, and he’s trotted out that same talking point that was on his note sheet during today’s House testimony.

But Facebook has relentlessly sought to acquire or co-opt the features of its competitors. That’s why any valuable regulation will require congress to prioritize competition. That means either breaking up Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp; avoiding rules that are easy for Facebook to comply with but prohibitively expensive for potential rivals to manage; or ensuring data portability that allows users to choose where to take their content and personal information.

Breaking up Facebook, or at least preventing it from acquiring established social networks in the future, would be the most powerful way to promote competition in the space. Facebook’s multi-app structure creates economies of scale in data that allow it to share ad targeting and sales teams, backend engineering, and relevancy-sorting algorithms. That makes it tough for smaller competitors without as much money or data to provide the public with more choice.

Regulation done wrong could create a moat for Facebook, locking in its lead. Complex transparency laws might be just a paperwork speed bump for Facebook and its army of lawyers, but could be too onerous for upstart companies to follow. Meanwhile, data collection regulation could prevent competitors from ever building as large of a data war chest as Facebook has already generated.

Data portability gives users the option to choose the best social network for them, rather than being stuck where they already are. Facebook provides a Download Your Information tool for exporting your content. But photos come back compressed, and you don’t get the contact info of friends unless they opt in. The list of friends’ names you receive doesn’t allow you to find them on other apps the way contact info would. Facebook should at least offer a method for your exporting hashed version of that contact info that other apps could use to help you find your friends there without violating the privacy of those friends. Meanwhile, Instagram entirely lacks a Download Your Information tool.

Congress should push Zuckerberg to explain what apps compete with Facebook as a core identity provider, an omni-purpose social graph, or cross-platform messaging app. Without choice, users are at the mercy of Facebook’s policy and product examples. All of the congressional questions about data privacy and security don’t mean much to the public if they have no viable alternative to Facebook. The fact that Facebook owns or clones the majority of the 8 social apps used by the average American is nothing for Zuckerberg to boast about.


Here at Dollar Destruction, we endeavour to bring to you the latest, most important news from around the globe. We scan the web looking for the most valuable content and dish it right up for you! The content of this article was provided by the source referenced. Dollar Destruction does not endorse and is not responsible for or liable for any content, accuracy, quality, advertising, products or other materials on this page. As always, we encourage you to perform your own research! 

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Author: Josh Constine
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How to Check If Your Facebook Data Was Shared With Cambridge Analytica

Facebook’s data privacy scandal, kicked off by Cambridge Analytica revelations late last month, is far from dying out. CEO Mark Zuckerberg is set to testify to US Congress on Tuesday and Wednesday, while other executives have begun doing the rounds of various regulators in Europe. Facebook had revealed that data of 87 million users had been shared, a number that was significantly larger than the original 50 million estimate. Amongst those, over 5 lakh users were from India.

The social network had last week promised it would notify all those users whose data had been improperly shared with Cambridge Analytica, starting April 9. However, those notifications appear to be slow to roll out. In the meanwhile, Facebook has released a tool that shows whether you were amongst those who were affected – specifically, by the This Is Your Digital Life app used by Cambridge Analytica.

To see if you were one of those whose data was improperly shared with Cambridge Analytica, you need to visit this Facebook Help Centre page. Titled ‘How can I tell if my info was shared with Cambridge Analytica?’, the page clearly explains the process to check.

A box is seen on the page, titled ‘Was my information shared?’, and within that lies the answer you’re looking for. If like us, you weren’t affected, you will be informed that “neither you nor your friends have logged into ‘This Is Your Digital Life’. As a result, it doesn’t appear your Facebook information was shared with Cambridge Analytica by ‘This Is Your Digital Life’.” Needless to say, you need to be logged in to Facebook to see the answer.

If in case your friend was affected – i.e., they used the This Is Your Digital Life app, some of your data would also have been improperly shared with Cambridge Analytica. The Facebook Help Centre page will mention this, however, it will not reveal who that friend is, presumably to prevent backlash. The company points both affected and unaffected users to another page where they can check and update the information they share with apps and websites.

To recall, Facebook last week silently added a bulk app removal tool that let users select multiple apps in one go to remove, rather than one at a time. This is useful to disconnect those third-party apps from your Facebook account that might be leaking your data.


Here at Dollar Destruction, we endeavour to bring to you the latest, most important news from around the globe. We scan the web looking for the most valuable content and dish it right up for you! The content of this article was provided by the source referenced. Dollar Destruction does not endorse and is not responsible for or liable for any content, accuracy, quality, advertising, products or other materials on this page. As always, we encourage you to perform your own research!

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Author: Gadgets 360 Staff
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