Samsung Galaxy S10 Bitcoin Wallet Leaked by Insider: Is it Official?

By CCN.com: BGR, a U.S.-based technology publication, reported that a Samsung insider leaked images of the new Galaxy S10 model equipped with a native Bitcoin wallet.

The Galaxy S10 has not yet been released to the public, but Samsung reportedly distributed the model to accessory makers and merchants.

Galaxy S10 with a Crypto Wallet?

According to Gregory Blake, who released several screenshots of a suspected Galaxy S10 prototype, the new model of the South Korean mobile phone manufacturing giant has an integrated feature called “Samsung Blockchain KeyStore” that enables users to have full control over their private keys and crypto funds.

Once the Blockchain KeyStore is authenticated and enabled on the device, users are able to begin sending and receiving cryptocurrency using the native crypto wallet on the mobile phone.

The screenshot shared by Blake revealed Ethereum as the only supported cryptocurrency on the device, possibly because the phone is still a prototype. However, one image included graphics that appeared to be bitcoins, so it’s likely more currencies would be included at launch.

Verifying that the phone in question is a Galaxy S10, a technology journalist at BGR Chris Smith explained:

“We know it’s a Galaxy S10 phone because the punch-hole camera is placed near the top right corner. The A8s’ selfie cam is on the left side. Also, we know it’s a Galaxy S10 phone rather than a Galaxy S10+ model because it features a single-lens selfie camera. It’s clear the handset isn’t the Lite version, because the screen has curved edges, rather than flat.”

Previously, CCN reported on Dec 13, 2018, that Samsung plans to integrate a crypto cold storage into its S10 model following the company’s filing of trademarks for Samsung blockchain.

At the time, SamMobile executive editor Adnan Farooqui confirmed that the company is developing a cold storage crypto wallet and intends to integrate it in the Galaxy S10.

Why it Makes Sense for Samsung to Integrate a Bitcoin Wallet

In July of last year, Samsung Insights reported that the most secure device to run a cryptocurrency wallet on is a mobile phone due to the presence of a Trusted Execution Environment (TEE).

Dissimilar to laptops, PCs, and other types of devices, smartphones have a native environment that operates independently of the memory and storage. As such, data stored in a TEE cannot be altered by the operating system, completely eliminating the possibility of a security breach affecting data stored in the trusted environment.

By utilizing a TEE on a mobile phone, a crypto wallet can operate much more securely and efficiently than laptops and desktops, which still remain as a popular platform for wallets and exchanges.

“This is why smartphones have an edge over laptops and desktops for cryptocurrency wallets: without the benefits of the hardware-based TEE, the keys are more vulnerable,” Joel Snyder, a senior IT consultant and Samsung Insights contributor, said. “There is a significant caveat: a naïve wallet developer might choose to simply store the keys on the normal internal storage of the phone, in which case there’s little additional protection from using the smartphone platform. Or the wallet itself might be malware, in which case all bets are off.”

“But with the right wallet leveraging the benefits of smartphone TEE, there’s no place safer to store your money.”

If the official Galaxy S10 model launches with a native Bitcoin and Ethereum wallet, it may pose a significant threat to companies such as HTC and projects working on blockchain phones that exclusively support cryptocurrencies.


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Author: Joseph Young 
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This is Verizon’s first 5G smartphone

Hint: The phone may sound familiar.

 

Verizon’s first 5G smartphone didn’t start out as 5G device. But it will once the wireless carrier formally launches its next-generation mobile service.

The first smartphone will be Motorola’s Moto Z3, Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg confirmed in an interview in the backstage of the CES 2019 keynote presentation area on Monday. But the catch? This originally launched in August as a 4G phone with the option of a Moto Mod attachment that would eventually give it a 5G capability.

36motorola-moto-z3

It turns out, the 5G Moto Mod will make the Moto Z3 the inaugural phone once Verizon turns on its mobile 5G service. A Samsung smartphone teased by Verizon and Qualcomm at the Snapdragon Tech Summit last month will be the second device. And while AT&T and Sprint have both said they will carry the Samsung phone too, Vestberg reaffirmed that it has an exclusive deal. That indicates the Samsung phone will likely come to Verizon first for an exclusive period before moving on to the other carriers.

While Vestberg declined to comment on the exact timing of the launch, you can sketch out the potential window. It’s widely anticipated that Samsung will launch a 5G variant of its Galaxy S10, which usually launches in late February around the Mobile World Congress trade show. Vestberg’s comments indicate that the service and the 5G Moto Mod will launch before then.

This would give Verizon an advantage as the first carrier to launch a 5G service with a smartphone. Carriers around the world have fallen over themselves to proclaim themselves as the first to 5G, which gives them bragging rights and helps cement the perception of network superiority. That’s become critically important as the competition for consumers heat up, since network quality remains a big deciding factor.

5G is all the rage at CES 2019, and is one of the dominant trends at the show. The next generation of wireless service is expected to bring a big boost in speed and network responsiveness, which opens the door to a better mobile experience, as well new areas of tech like streaming VR or telemedicine.

Vestberg has long proclaimed that Verizon would be the first to launch 5G. It rolled out a 5G variant of home broadband service in October, although skeptics claimed it didn’t count because it used non-industry standard technology. AT&T in December launched 5G mobile service, but customers in select cities can only tap into the network using Wi-Fi hotspots, and not smartphones.

Regardless of who’s first, it’s clear 5G is slowly turning from hype into reality, especially as broader deployments of the network are underway with many carriers around the world.  T-Mobile promises to have broader commercial service available early this year, and Sprint and LG are promising the first 5G smartphone. T-Mobile and Sprint promise to do even more together if they merge.


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Author: Roger Cheng
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Samsung’s next wireless charger will juice up two devices at once

Samsung is reportedly planning to release a two-in-one charger for its smartphones and the upcoming Galaxy Watch. Packaging for the Wireless Charger Duo has leaked ahead of Samsung’s Unpacked press conference, which will be held at Barclays Center on August 9th.



The Wireless Charger Duo box reveals that it’s capable of charging either two Qi-compatible phones simultaneously or one phone and the Galaxy Watch. Both placement areas support fast wireless charging. The upcoming Note 9 is rumored to feature a 4,000mAh battery, and Samsung has registered a new wireless charger that could improve upon the already-fast wireless recharge capabilities of recent Galaxy smartphones. It’s not yet clear whether the Wireless Charger Duo will be capable of that higher output.

After early rumors hinted at Samsung making a return to Google’s Wear OS with its next smartwatch, that’s looking less and less likely. The Galaxy Watch is believed to again run the company’s own Tizen software.

The Wireless Charger Duo comes as Apple continues working away on its AirPower mat, which was first announced at last September’s iPhone event. While two-way chargers are relatively common, Apple has said that AirPower will simultaneously charge three devices — such as an iPhone, Apple Watch, and AirPods. In June, Bloomberg reported that Apple has faced “a series of technical hurdles” during the course of AirPower’s development, such as making sure the charging mat doesn’t overheat and working with its “complex” circuitry.

Again, Samsung’s Wireless Charger Duo just covers two devices at once. The company’s Icon X earbuds don’t support wireless charging as of yet. But if you’re planning to pick up both the Note 9 and Galaxy Watch, it might prove a convenient (albeit probably very pricey) accessory.


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Samsung profits surge on high demand for Bitcoin Mining Chips

South Korean Samsung Electronics saw its operating profits surge in the first quarter of this year compared to the previous year. The company attributes the increase to its semiconductor division which manufactures bitcoin mining chips and says that it expects the trend to continue into the second quarter.

Profits Surging

A world leader in advanced semiconductor technology, South Korean Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. recently announced its 1Q18 earnings results. Samsung Electronics is the flagship company of the Samsung Group with assembly plants and sales network in 80 countries.

In the first quarter of this year, the company recorded consolidated earnings of 60.56 trillion won (~US$56 billion). Its operating profits were 15.64 trillion won (~$14.5 billion), a 58% increase from 9.9 trillion won (~$9.2 billion) achieved during the same period last year. Meanwhile, its year-on-year sales grew approximately 20%.

The Seoul Newspaper elaborated that Samsung Electronics’ “semiconductor division…accounted for about three-quarters (73%) of total operating profits, leading the company to a record high.” Samsung explained:

“Demand for the semiconductor division increased due to sales of system LSIs [ASICs] for flagship smartphones and demand for virtual currency mining chips”.

Samsung’s Mining Chips & Earnings Outlook

Samsung confirmed in January that it had begun manufacturing ASIC chips used for mining cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin and ether. Without providing details, a company spokesperson told Techcrunch at the time that “Samsung’s foundry business is currently engaged in the manufacturing of cryptocurrency mining chips.”

Samsung Electronics offers design services which connect “mid-to small-sized companies with qualified ASIC design services and support.” In January, the Samsung Advanced Foundry Ecosystem program was launched to ensure deep collaboration between the Samsung foundry, ecosystem partners, and customers.

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Mining rig manufacturer Halong Mining has previously revealed that its flagship product, the Dragonmint T1 Miner, uses Samsung’s 10nm T1558 mining chips, calling them “the first-ever 10nm bitcoin mining chips.” Halong says their rig is “the world’s most efficient bitcoin miner, operating at 16TH with Asicboost technology inside for greater power efficiency.”

“Earnings growth should continue in 2Q18, driven by demand for HPC-based semiconductors and an increase in supply of new 10nm process products,” Samsung Electronics detailed, emphasizing that “In the foundry business, despite a decline in demand for mobile parts due to seasonal weakness in 1Q18, earnings increased on the back of high-performance computing (HPC) chip orders.” The company continued to share:

“The foundry business is expected to secure the second place in the industry with more than $10 billion in sales”.

Mining Chip Market

In the field of ASIC mining chip manufacturing, Samsung Electronics is competing with a few other chipset manufacturers. The largest is Taiwan’s TSMC, which supplies mining chips to mining hardware makers such as Bitmain and Canaan. Recently, news.Bitcoin.com reported on TSMC hitting record sales during March due to demand for the hardware required for crypto mining.

According to a Trendforce study published in November of last year, TSMC held a 55.9% market share by revenue in the semiconductor foundry business, followed by Global Foundries with 9.4% market share, UMC with 8.5% and then Samsung with 7.7% market share.


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Samsung Sets Q1 Profit Record with Crypto Mining Boost

Samsung Electronics has reported 58 percent year-on-year growth in its operating profits for Q1 2018 – an increase driven in part by strong demand for cryptocurrency mining chips.
During a financial earnings call on Thursday, Robert M. Yi, Samsung’s executive vice president of investor relations, said the profitability increase seen in the firm’s semiconductor business played a significant role in setting a new quarterly operating profit record of 15.6 trillion Korean won ($14 billion).


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“In the semiconductor business, the earning increases significantly year over year thanks to favorable market conditions driven by strong demands in server and graphic card memories as well as earning improvement in both the System LSI and Foundry businesses led by an increasing demand of chips used in flagship smartphones and cryptocurrency mining.”

While Samsung did not disclose precise figures for the mining chip side of the business, the positive figures follow a February confirmation from the tech giant that it was now producing 8nm and 11nm processors to meet growing market demand from the cryptocurrency mining industry.

Samsung’s expansion into cryptocurrency mining also adds to the regional competition in the sector, with Taiwanese chip maker TSMC also reporting similar growth in mining chip demand during its own recent earnings call.

Looking ahead, Samsung forecast that the demand for mining processors will continue to expand in Q2, while the earnings of its LSI and Foundry businesses may decrease due to slowing demand for smartphone components.


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Blockchain Is About to Revolutionize the Shipping Industry

  • Maersk, APL, Hyundai race to build paperless cargo system
  • Adoption of blockchain could generate $1 trillion in trade

Globalization has brought the most advanced trading networks the world has seen, with the biggest, fastest vessels, robot-operated ports and vast computer databases tracking cargoes. But it all still relies on millions and millions of paper documents.

That last throwback to 19th century trade is about to fall. A.P. Moeller-Maersk A/S and other container shipping lines have teamed up with technology companies to upgrade the world’s most complex logistics network.

The prize is a revolution in world trade on a scale not seen since the move to standard containers in the 1960s – a change that ushered in the age of globalization. But the undertaking is as big as the potential upheaval it will cause. To make it work, dozens of shipping lines and thousands of related businesses around the world — including manufacturers, banks, insurers, brokers and port authorities — will have to work out a protocol that can integrate all the new systems onto one vast platform.

Should they succeed, documentation that takes days will eventually be done in minutes, much of it without the need for human input. The cost of moving goods across continents could drop dramatically, adding fresh impetus to relocate manufacturing or source materials and goods from overseas.

“This would be the biggest innovation in the industry since the containerization,” said Rahul Kapoor, an analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence in Singapore. “It basically brings more transparency and efficiency. The container shipping lines are coming out of their shells and playing catch-up in technology.”

The key, as in so many other industries, from oil tankers to cryptocurrencies, is blockchain, the electronic ledger system that allows transactions to be verified autonomously. And the benefits wouldn’t be confined to shipping. Improving communications and border administration using blockchain could generate an additional $1 trillion in global trade, according to the World Economic Forum.

APL Ltd., owned by the world’s third-largest container line CMA CGM SA, together with Anheuser-Busch InBev NV, Accenture Plc, a European customs organization and other companies said last month that they’ve tested a blockchain-based platform. South Korea’s Hyundai Merchant Marine Co. held trial runs last year using a system developed with Samsung SDS Co.

The shipping paper trail begins when a cargo owner books space on a ship to move goods. Documents need to be filled in and approved before cargo can enter or leave a port. A single shipment can require hundreds pages that need to be physically delivered to dozens of different agencies, banks, customs bureaus and other entities.

Trail of Roses

In 2014, Maersk followed a refrigerated container filled with roses and avocados from Kenya to the Netherlands. The company found that almost 30 people and organizations were involved in processing the box on its journey to Europe. The shipment took about 34 days to get from the farm to the retailers, including 10 days waiting for documents to be processed. One of the critical documents went missing, only to be found later amid a pile of paper.

“The paperwork and processes vital to global trade are also one of its biggest burdens,” according to Maersk, the world’s largest container shipping company, which has teamed up with International Business Machines Corp. to enable real-time tracking of its cargo and documents using blockchain. “The paper trail research that Maersk did uncovered the extent of the burden that documents and processes inflict on trade and the consequences.”

That plethora of paper processors has been one of the reasons shipping has lagged behind other industries in moving to electronic forms. The variety of different languages, laws and organizations involved in moving cargoes in the past made standardization a slow process.

Instead the industry has relied on advances in transport technology and cargo handling to improve efficiency, with the great Clipper sailing vessels replaced by steamships and then modern oil-powered leviathans – the largest ships on the oceans. In the 1850s, it took more than three months to move chests of tea from southern China to London. Today, that journey would take about 30 days.

The biggest change came in the 1960s, when the industry adopted the standard-size steel boxes in use today, replacing the wooden crates, chests and sacks that stevedores had hauled on the docks for centuries.

With these containers sometimes holding products from different suppliers, and ship cargoes sometimes ending up with thousands of customers in dozens of countries, the transition to a uniform electronic system presents major challenges.

“Not all stakeholders are looking at deploying the same blockchain solution and platforms,” APL said in response to questions. “This can pose as a challenge if stakeholders are expected to trade via a common platform or solution.”

And the shipping lines will also need to persuade the ports and other organizations involved in cargo trading to adopt their systems. Maersk said Singapore-based port operator PSA International Pte. and APM Terminals, based in The Hague, Netherlands, will use its platform. APL and Accenture said they plan to pilot their product by the end of this year. Accenture said it has tested its technology with other pilot shipments that range from beer to medical supplies.

The cost savings could be visible in the companies’ financial statements in about two years, Kapoor of Bloomberg Intelligence said.

“Shipping needs to stop thinking about itself as this standalone middle sector,” said K D Adamson, chief executive officer of Futurenautics Group. “It needs to start thinking about how the different elements of shipping fit into other ecosystems.”

 


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Samsung Jumps on the Blockchain Bandwagon

The world’s biggest maker of smartphones and semiconductors may use the technology behind cryptocurrencies to manage its vast global supply network.

 Samsung Electronics Co. is considering a blockchain ledger system to keep track of global shipments worth tens of billion of dollars a year, according to Song Kwang-woo, the blockchain chief at Samsung SDS Co., the group’s logistical and information and technology arm. The system could cut shipping costs by 20 percent, according to SDS.
While companies around the world have said they’re planning to deploy blockchain technology on everything from cross-border payments to tracking the life-cycle of supermarket chickens, Samsung Group is one of the first global manufacturers to take a serious look at using the distributed ledgers in its operations. SDS is working on the system for Samsung Electronics, the conglomerate’s crown jewel.
“It will have an enormous impact on the supply chains of manufacturing industries,” said Song, who’s also a vice president at SDS. “Blockchain is a core platform to fuel our digital transformation.”

Thrust into the spotlight by bitcoin’s meteoric rise, blockchain technology has been touted as a breakthrough that will transform the way transactions are recorded, verified and shared. While its impact on the corporate world has been limited so far, Gartner Inc. predicts blockchain-related businesses will create $176 billion of value by 2025.

 

Blockchain proponents in the shipping industry say the technology reduces the time needed to send paperwork back and forth and to coordinate with port authorities. Documentation costs for container shipments are more than twice as big as those for transportation, according to International Business Machines Corp., which is working with A.P. Moeller-Maersk A/S to track cargo movements and automate shipping paperwork.

 

“It cuts overhead and eliminates bottlenecks,” Cheong said. “It’s about maximizing supply efficiency and visibility, which translates into greater consumer confidence.”


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Author: Sam Kim
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Samsung Galaxy S9 review

Where the S8 was great, the S9 is only fine

The Samsung Galaxy S9 is the phone that’s supposed to lead the charge where the Galaxy S8 , one of the best phones we’ve ever tested, left off – but it’s not as much of an upgrade.
Well, that’s at first glance, because there is a raft of updates that some would find appealing. Yes, the design is identical to the Galaxy S8, and in reality this really should have been the ‘S’ variant of that model if Samsung ever wanted to ape Apple’s naming strategy.

But there’s also a new, high-power camera on the back that brings genuine innovation in the dual-aperture shutter, as well as a more robust frame and so, so much more power under the hood.

The screen is brighter and the dual speakers make this more of a media marvel – and the Galaxy S9 fixes one major flaw with the S8 by making it easy to unlock the phone with your face or finger, which 2017’s model failed at – and that’s why we’ve named it as one of our best smartphones around at the moment.

If this sounds like we’re talking up an uninspiring phone, that’s partly true – but we wanted to make sure you knew the big changes on the S9 if you were confused on why it looks so similar to last year’s model.

These plus points are also set against a backdrop of a high price; we’re not talking iPhone X levels here, but it’s still one of the more expensive options you can buy. The larger Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus with a 6.2-inch screen is even pricier.

So if you’re looking to replace a 2016 phone do all the new features really offer enough to make the Galaxy S9 a worthwhile upgrade, or is the cheaper Galaxy S8 still the best phone in the world?

The Samsung Galaxy S9 release date was March 16, with pre-orders being delivered slightly ahead of this around the world – so you’re able to buy it now.

The Galaxy S9 is on sale for £739, $719.99, or AU$1,199 SIM-free directly from Samsung, but exact pricing for other markets is currently unclear.

In the UK, that’s a huge price jump over last year’s handset, which cost £689 at launch, and it’s the same price our sources reported before it was made official.

In terms of a UK cost on contract you can expect to pay between £35 and £50 per month for a decent slug of data, although with many contracts you’ll need to pay a little upfront too.

In the US, we’re seeing around $30 a month for the contract, and between $720-$800 for the phone itself. It’s actually a little cheaper in the US compared to the Galaxy S8, bucking the trend we’re seeing in other regions worldwide.

There aren’t any storage variants of this phone though in the UK or US, with only the 64GB option on sale.

AR Emoji

It took us a little while to come around to the idea of AR Emoji… and then not too long to get bored by them again.

Let’s be honest here: these are a clear response to Apple’s Animoji, which gained a lot of attention when the iPhone X launched, and which make use of the True Depth camera on the front of the iPhone X.

Samsung’s offering feels like a watered-down version of this, albeit one with a bit more personality. To create your own little avatar you simply smile into the front-facing camera, and the Galaxy S9 creates your own digital version of you.

Once it’s created, you can change your avi’s hair and skin colour and choose an outfit – it’s a shame there aren’t more customisation options here, as the outfits are a bit limited and the hair colours aren’t particularly nuanced.

This may seem like a tiny thing, but if you can’t make your AR Emoji look like you then you – and your friends – are going to struggle to engage with it.

In our testing we found that we needed to create our avatar a few times, as there were occasional glitches like a weird face shape or the wrong-coloured eyes.

We also had to get used to the fact that it doesn’t look like us all the time, although in some of the instantly-generated GIFs you can use for social media we suddenly saw that our AR Emoji mimicked some of our features well from different angles.

Those GIFs are probably the best thing about this new feature – and they get tiresome relatively quickly. You send a few to friends on compatible apps (the AR Emoji GIFs are baked into the Galaxy S9’s keyboard, but you can’t add them in Twitter or Gmail, only in apps like WhatsApp at the moment), but the novelty wears off pretty quickly.

The other thing you can do is record a video of yourself speaking as the AR Emoji… and this is where things start to unravel. The Galaxy S9 picks up most of your features, but also gives your avatar a little flickering mouth or eye at times when the camera loses you.

It shows that, to make this feature work properly, brands need a more powerful camera, rather than just relying on software and the front-facing option.

AR Emoji are fun for a little while, but on their own they’re certainly not a reason to buy this phone.

Bixby is back… and better

We were thoroughly disappointed by Bixby on the Galaxy S8 last year, as it promised to be the ultimate digital assistant and, well, it wasn’t.

It simply couldn’t do enough – it wasn’t able to work out what you wanted contextually, and it wasn’t able to start or control enough apps. We could forgive the gestation period for this feature if it wasn’t for the fact that Google Assistant is already on the phone, and incredibly capable.

However, Samsung has upgraded Bixby on the Galaxy S9, and kept the Bixby button on the side of the device to allow you to interact with your assistant. You use the button as on a walkie-talkie, pressing to talk to Bixby and releasing when you’ve delivered your command… but it’s a bit slow to catch up.

Bixby can be too literal – wanting to set a timer preset rather than just starting a countdown for example – and while you can ask it to take a picture and send it to a friend the whole process takes around 30 seconds – and that’s assuming Bixby can find the friend to start with – in which time you’d rather just do it manually.

The Galaxy S9 also keeps telling us that we can dictate using Bixby, but this was never 100% accurate – it was pretty darn good, considering that you’re essentially talking to a baby robot, but we needed to edit our words before sending.

Bixby Vision has come a long way though – and the fact that it’s turned off by default is just beautiful. No longer do the little green fireflies automatically dance across your viewfinder when you’re trying to take a picture of your car, dog, mother or laundry basket (to show her you’ve done it all) as the phone tries to work out what’s being looked at.

However, when you do turn on Vision the features are pretty useful. Bixby is much, much better at being able to work out what it’s seeing than what it’s hearing, and can give accurate results on the web for things like comics, lamps and nature scenes.

The translation tool is also very strong – it comes up with some weird answers here and there, but on the whole it’s very easy to work out what you’re looking at. Samsung is making a big deal about this feature, although in reality it’s a bit niche… you’ll need to be in a foreign country, with data, and completely unable to work out what you’re looking at.
So while it’s good that Bixby has been upgraded, to at least bring some sense to having that button on the side of the phone, it’s still a novelty rather than a must-have feature.
Mapping the button to Google Assistant is still a far better way to get the most from your phone with your voice (although you’ll need to download a third party app to do it), despite it being more limited in scope… at least it manages the things it can do very well.

Improved biometrics

Anyone who read our Galaxy S8 review last year would have realised quite quickly that the biometric unlocking features of that phone almost made it unusable. The fingerprint scanner was too hard to reach, the iris scanner too unreliable and the facial recognition just too poor.

Samsung needed to do something, and it has, with all three features now working seamlessly and interchangeably.

Intelligent Scan marries the iris scanner and facial recognition to make unlocking your phone with your face a far, far simpler task, and as mentioned the fingerprint scanner is much easier to hit.

The speed of the Intelligent Snan feature is so much better than last year… where the iris scanner and facial recognition on the S8 were between 30% and 50% accurate, the two together on the Galaxy S9 yield success almost every time.

In low light the iris scanner is still a bit slow to react, and not always pleased to let you in (in this case, Apple’s Face ID absolutely destroys it for accuracy and ease of use), but it’s so simple to just flick your finger to the scanner on the back that we never had an issue.
That’s a real benefit over the iPhone X, keeping the fingerprint scanner.

There are a couple of flaws with the biometric system. First, the 2D scan of the face the S9 makes to recognize you isn’t as secure as other methods, like the fingerprint scanner or Apple’s Face ID.

That’s not a huge problem for us – the fingerprint scanner is a better way of paying for things anyway, and really biometric unlocking is more about convenience than it is security.

We weren’t able to dupe the Samsung Galaxy S9 with a picture of our face, so if you lose your phone you can feel secure in the knowledge that the thief isn’t getting in, which is what most of us really want.

Second, and more frustratingly, you can’t really unlock the phone when it’s placed on a table – the field of vision for the scanner is limited, so unless you weirdly shove your head over it you won’t get in, whereas Apple’s Face ID offers a much wider viewing angle.

New speakers

The other key feature that Samsung is talking up on the Galaxy S9 is the improved speaker setup. If you’re tired of hearing sound shoot out the bottom of your phone, you’ll appreciate that the top earpiece is now able to fire out sound towards your face.

These speakers have also been tuned to support Dolby Atmos sound, giving you a sense of space from the audio coming out from your phone.

Given how thin this phone is, the overall volume and quality of sound coming out of it is impressive. If anything the volume can go a little too high, and we found ourselves turning it down on occasion, despite only watching videos on social media.

The quality isn’t the best on the market – there’s definitely a little more punch and clarity from the iPhone X, where the Galaxy S9 is a little bit muddier – but the idea here isn’t to replace a Bluetooth speaker, but rather provide a decent experience when listening to music or podcasts without earphones.


 

Here at Dollar Destruction, we endeavour to bring to you the latest, most important news from around the globe. We scan the web looking for the most valuable content and dish it right up for you! The content of this article was provided by the source referenced. Dollar Destruction does not endorse and is not responsible for or liable for any content, accuracy, quality, advertising, products or other materials on this page. As always, we encourage you to perform your own research!

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Author Gareth Beavis 

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